Theory: Joaquin Phoenix's Joker - Batman's brother?
Arthur Fleck Joaquin Phoenix in The Joker seems to be literally obsessed with the Wayne family - perhaps because he is one of them. The plot clues and details related…

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Pratt VS Evans VS Hamsworth: 3 Best Chris Marvel
This is one of the main debates in pop culture, a debate that will never be resolved: who is the best Chris Marvel? There are three applicants: Chris Evans (Captain…

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Interview with Philip Pullman: “I have always loved comics, and now I am writing one of them”
Philip Pulman tells Nicolette Jones about his new graphic novel, which takes place on the high seas, and why he is going to endow the nation with his ponytail. In…

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superhero Tyumen

From Zadie Smith to Ethan Hawke: Why We Love Graphic Novels

Zadie Smith, writer How did you happen to get involved in graphic novels? As a child, I read a lot of comics, mostly old Disney issues about Donald Duck and his nephews. More “Asterix”, “Tintin” and all that. But the first adult graphic work that had a strong influence on me is the book of Richard Appignanese and Robert Kramb Franz Kafka. She is still one of my favorites. Later, I lived in the same apartment with my son Richard Josh, and he had a huge collection of comics and manga, and I read them all. When I first came to America 18 years ago, I did not live long in Greenpoint, in Brooklyn. Then it was a kind of proto-hipster district. On the corner was a small bookstore specializing in McSweeney’s graphic novels and books. There I found Chris Weir and his series on Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth. As soon as I started reading Chris’s story, she immediately captured me. Now one of my most valuable things is the sketch of Corrigan, who says: “Ha ha … hi Zedy …”. I made Chris draw it for me when I met him in London about a year in 2000. Page from the comic “Here” What do you like about Continue reading

“Rap Robot Max”, the first hip-hop comic book

Today, the hip-hop industry and everything connected with it – music, clothes, concert tickets – is a place where many billions of dollars rotate, but from the beginning of the 70s to the beginning of the 80s it was more of a job from the category ” Do it yourself”. DJs and AMs burned at parties in community centers; dancers practiced their movements in clubs, not in video; and artists began to wrest their way from the bottom, and not from the galleries. It was in that spirit that Eric Orr, an artist from the Bronx, published the comic strip “Robot Max Max” dedicated to hip-hop culture in 1986, which became widely known as the first hip-hop comic book. Orr fell in love with comics in his early childhood — so much so that he and his brothers were ready to steal Sunday comics from the church. The first comic-style drawing he created depicted Charlie Brown (the hero of the comic book series Little Bellied Trigger, orig. Peanuts – approx. Continue reading

The art of illustrating the “Art of War”

When more than thirty years ago Tsai (Tsai Chih Chung) decided to adapt Sun Tzu’s “Art of War” into a more modern format, he wanted to breathe new life into the 2500-year-old text. “When interpreting the need to pass on the classics to new generations, people often mean classics that are extremely sterile, monotonous and, in truth, tedious,” Tsai explained. Having studied several editions of the treatise and secondary sources, he realized that he was able to rethink The Art of War (which to this day remains one of the most important literary works about war and strategy) and present it to the world as an illustrated story. In 1990, Tsai created a comic version for a Chinese audience, and in 1994 an English version. Since then, millions of copies of his expanded, Illustrated Chinese Classics Library series (which included, among others, the book) have been sold.
Tsai’s adaptation revived the millennial treatise The Art of War. The artist cut out repeating, narrative-dragging elements until the ancient lessons of the war came to life on the pages. But it was drawings that became the defining element of Tsai’s work. His style, somewhat reminiscent of Disney cartoons, brings Continue reading

The term “graphic novel” did a good job. We don’t need him anymore
Hey Glen, did you hear? Last March, March: Book Three by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, written by Congressman John Lewis, co-authored with Andrew Aidin, is the…

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The man who made millions on old basement comics
The story of how a life-changing collection almost ended up in the trash bin Among collectors of a certain age, lamentations are very common, like "My mother threw away all…

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7 biographical comics worth reading
The style of the biographical comic strip about Vincent Van Gogh at first seems ridiculous: simple dialogues, stick-stick-cucumber faces, instead of impressionism and sensitive details - pictures in the spirit…

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10 deaths of Captain America, real and fictional
Death in comics has ceased to create the desired effect, in my opinion, a very long time ago. Only an inexperienced reader can take seriously the death of a hero…

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