Almighty, the greatest and ... helpless
Almighty comic book characters, whoever they are (aliens, mutants, wizards), this is a real headache for screenwriters. Year after year, decade after decade, you need to come up with stupid…

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Difficulties in illustrating Anne Frank's diary
After living a year and a half locked up in her father’s office building, 14-year-old Anna Frank writes in her diary that she wants to be an ordinary teenager and…

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The man who made millions on old basement comics
The story of how a life-changing collection almost ended up in the trash bin Among collectors of a certain age, lamentations are very common, like "My mother threw away all…

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somehow succeeds

What is happening in the world of movie comics

How adventures of people in ridiculous costumes became a powerful industry and how to get pleasure from it. Another ComicCon ended in California and presented us with a lot of info-guides: the Wonder Woman trailer from Gal Gadot, for example, a teaser for the new season of Game of Thrones and much more. But this is not even important, but another thing: the fact that film comics today is the top (in the box office, at least, sense) of the entire film industry, the last skeptic has ceased to doubt. The largest actors try on tights about who is better – Batman or Superman – adults argue on Facebook, and we analyze the phenomenon and how we came to this. The confrontation between DC and Marvel Any superhero movie that comes out for rent belongs to one of the two largest competing comic book studios – DC or Marvel. And this is a fundamental point: each studio has a set of its heroes, its drama and the characteristic tone of the narrative. And therefore, having even a slight idea of ​​each of them, you can Continue reading

The term “graphic novel” did a good job. We don’t need him anymore

Hey Glen, did you hear? Last March, March: Book Three by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, written by Congressman John Lewis, co-authored with Andrew Aidin, is the final part of a graphic trilogy about the participation of young Lewis in civil rights movement – received the National Book Award in the category “Youth Literature”! I heard! This is unbelievable! And not only the fact of the gain itself, but also the comic book itself, which very touchingly and reliably shows us that era that required a lot of effort and hard work, but managed to change America. Lewis and his screenwriting colleague Aydin took the time to dig up quite a few small stories of people about the pain, suffering, doubts and fear that ordinary historical books usually bypass. And the artist Nate Powell managed to make it so that you can feel all these emotions – as well as moments of joy and final triumph. Ultimately, this work is more than just instructions for organizing civil disobedience. This is painful but hopeful evidence of the power of protest and the glorification of those young people who sacrificed their security in order to make their own country a little more fair. Yes, I thought you should like it. For I know what a lover of graphic novels you are. … This is not a graphic novel. What? This is the second time you have called it a graphic novel. Stop calling it a graphic novel. This is not a graphic novel. First of all, it’s non-fiction. … Oh. Right Sorry. And these are graphic memoirs. Well, now “graphic Continue reading

What Batman did for me

The task that we traditionally assign to classical culture is successfully completed by comics. Once I wrote about the fact that Russian classics do not instill morality (if morality means banal following examples), but provides material for reflection. Now let’s talk about what works still teach morality. While teachers, methodologists and officials are arguing about the pros and cons of a single textbook on literature, schoolchildren have completely different problems. A film about Batman and Superman, for example, or “Magic Creatures.” Because comics and films on them do for children something that school literature does not cope with. It’s not even about finding easy entertainment instead of excruciating thoughts about the eternal, but about real and simple role models. A teenager needs to turn to positive patterns, and exploits and adventures excite the imagination. And here pop culture comes into play, the products of which lovers of the classics dismissively call “chewing gum for the brain.” In elementary school, I read stories about Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and later switched to DC and Marvel comics. I met Batman around the time when we walked onegin and stavrogin in the classroom, and in the corridors we encountered the merciless bullying of the nineties: high school students took money from the younger for Continue reading

Body of work: how a graphic novel became an outlet for the release of female shame
This art form has allowed many female illustrators to point out inconsistencies in how they see their bodies and the bodies of men around them. Author: Abrams Books A Picture…

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10 black widow solo fan fan theories
With the release of Avengers: Finale and Spider-Man: Away from Home, the Infinity Saga and the third phase of the MCU have come to an end. Many of our favorite…

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From Zadie Smith to Ethan Hawke: Why We Love Graphic Novels
Zadie Smith, writer How did you happen to get involved in graphic novels? As a child, I read a lot of comics, mostly old Disney issues about Donald Duck and…

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Tobias Carroll on the Generating Power of Literary Adaptation
Since the advent of language, there is a form of its transmission. Comic book creators have long used literary sources for inspiration or direct retelling. We have come a long…

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