Comic book industry: the eternal confrontation between DC and Marvel
They made every effort to create their own and completely fantastic world. Both publishers have repeatedly changed their names and approaches to the audience in order to keep their attention.…

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Special nomination "The Best Graphic Novels"
As part of the 2016 Readers' Choice Award, we present you our Special Opportunity project. This is a series of book reviews that have received particular attention this year. In…

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"Love and rockets" again on horseback: "We have influenced a bunch of artists"
The cult comic strip about California punks next month will return to newsstands and talk about heroes looking back on their own lives. One of the leading comic book industry…

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seventieth birthday

Special nomination “The Best Graphic Novels”

As part of the 2016 Readers’ Choice Award, we present you our Special Opportunity project. This is a series of book reviews that have received particular attention this year. In other words, we have collected statistics on several categories of readership ratings. Each issue of the review will be devoted to one of them. Still don’t like comics, because it’s “dumb pictures”? Yes, you, my friend, are behind the times! Start with the best graphic novels of this year and discover a new world of book fun. If someone with the word “comic” still only thinks of funny pictures from old chewing gum with Donald Duck or super-men pulled into a bright leotard, this person, in truth, can only be regretted. This someone does not even suspect what is losing. A whole world of highly artistic and well-designed works, many of which are not inferior in concept depth to the winners of the most prestigious awards. Modern graphic novels offer stories for every taste – dystopias, noir detective stories, science fiction, social networks, fantasy, war Continue reading

The term “graphic novel” did a good job. We don’t need him anymore

Hey Glen, did you hear? Last March, March: Book Three by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, written by Congressman John Lewis, co-authored with Andrew Aidin, is the final part of a graphic trilogy about the participation of young Lewis in civil rights movement – received the National Book Award in the category “Youth Literature”! I heard! This is unbelievable! And not only the fact of the gain itself, but also the comic book itself, which very touchingly and reliably shows us that era that required a lot of effort and hard work, but managed to change America. Lewis and his screenwriting colleague Aydin took the time to dig up quite a few small stories of people about the pain, suffering, doubts and fear that ordinary historical books usually bypass. And the artist Nate Powell managed to make it so that you can feel all these emotions – as well as moments of joy and final triumph. Ultimately, this work is more than just instructions for organizing civil disobedience. This is painful but hopeful evidence of the power of protest and the glorification of those young people who sacrificed their security in order to make their own country a little more fair. Yes, I thought you should like it. For I know what a lover of graphic novels you are. … This is not a graphic novel. What? This is the second time you have called it a graphic novel. Stop calling it a graphic novel. This is not a graphic novel. First of all, it’s non-fiction. … Oh. Right Sorry. And these are graphic memoirs. Well, now “graphic Continue reading

What Batman did for me

The task that we traditionally assign to classical culture is successfully completed by comics. Once I wrote about the fact that Russian classics do not instill morality (if morality means banal following examples), but provides material for reflection. Now let’s talk about what works still teach morality. While teachers, methodologists and officials are arguing about the pros and cons of a single textbook on literature, schoolchildren have completely different problems. A film about Batman and Superman, for example, or “Magic Creatures.” Because comics and films on them do for children something that school literature does not cope with. It’s not even about finding easy entertainment instead of excruciating thoughts about the eternal, but about real and simple role models. A teenager needs to turn to positive patterns, and exploits and adventures excite the imagination. And here pop culture comes into play, the products of which lovers of the classics dismissively call “chewing gum for the brain.” In elementary school, I read stories about Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and later switched to DC and Marvel comics. I met Batman around the time when we walked onegin and stavrogin in the classroom, and in the corridors we encountered the merciless bullying of the nineties: high school students took money from the younger for Continue reading

Illustrator Tom Gold comments on his comics
Bumkniga publishes Cooking with Kafka, a new short comic book by Tom Gold. At the request of the Billboard Daily, illustrator The Guardian and The New Yorker commented on several…

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10 black widow solo fan fan theories
With the release of Avengers: Finale and Spider-Man: Away from Home, the Infinity Saga and the third phase of the MCU have come to an end. Many of our favorite…

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How Americans imported German humor
“Bam!” On Sunday: Comics pioneers are honored in Frankfurt as pioneers of contemporary art history. Against their background, Picasso looks outdated. Among them was a German artist. In 1900, a…

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10 deaths of Captain America, real and fictional
Death in comics has ceased to create the desired effect, in my opinion, a very long time ago. Only an inexperienced reader can take seriously the death of a hero…

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