Incomplete atlas of fantastic maps
In the second issue of The Keepers (comic book series), masked adventurers gather around a map of the United States. It shows in close-up the geographical regions marked as “Anti-war…

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The term “graphic novel” did a good job. We don’t need him anymore
Hey Glen, did you hear? Last March, March: Book Three by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, written by Congressman John Lewis, co-authored with Andrew Aidin, is the…

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“I don’t want the comic book to be beautiful”: interview with the creator of oil superhero Tyumen
Tyumen Gosha Elaev became famous by inventing the oil superhero Tyumen. The crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for the publication of the third volume of Tyumen is now ending. Yegor…

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crime thriller

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Art and suffering in Angouleme: Is there a place for a woman in the comic book industry?

The 43rd International Comic Festival, the most significant event of its kind in Europe, held in Angouleme, a city in France, ended a few days ago on a sullen note: during the award ceremony, the speaker, host of literary radio, took the floor and announced the first false winners, and only then real ones. The grand prize for a special book, the Fauve d’Or, ultimately went to Richard McGuire’s “Here,” described as “brilliant and revolutionary” by Luke Sant in the New York Times. But the damage has already been done. Not only the publishers and authors felt humiliated, but it was also unclear how the ceremonial master could have thought that such a cruel trick could be fun. The opening of the Festival took place in the same unpleasant vein, with a wave of tactless comments by their director Frank Bond, after the organizers were accused of sexism. The list of 30 nominees did not include a single woman. Then Calvin Reid, senior editor of weekly news in the publishing world and co-editor of PW Comics World, organized a roundtable in Angouleme to discuss the presence of women in the comic book world. Continue reading

When were superheroes gloomy and harsh?

The conditional periodization of American comic books about superheroes implies decline. The formation years of the genre, 1938-1945, are called the Golden Age. Then – after a ten-year hiatus, when superheroes were eclipsed by other genres such as horror, detective stories, and love stories – a DC Silver re-launch of Flash in Showcase No. 4 opened in October 1956 by DC Comics. This period, marked by the revival of DC Golden Age superheroes and the reign of Marvel Comics, continues until 1970, when it is replaced by the Bronze Age. A new phase has recently appeared in this history of decline, dubbed the Dark Age of Comics. Unlike the phrase “New Time”, used to refer to the same period, “The Dark Age” suggests a figurative fall in the comics about superheroes to the level of cultural impoverishment, which is associated with stereotypes of medieval Europe. The irony is that the Dark Age was marked by a series of revolutionary publications that helped improve the cultural position of superhero comics. The most famous of these iconic comics are Watchmen (1986–1987) by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons and Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns (1986). These serious, autoreflective texts that set new standards for the formal and thematic possibilities of the genre can, in fact, be considered as texts characterizing the Dark Age, which, according to some formulations, continues from the mid-1980s to the present. Thus, despite its name, the Dark Age of Comics marked the emergence of real masterpieces and the Continue reading

Interview with Philip Pullman: “I have always loved comics, and now I am writing one of them”

Philip Pulman tells Nicolette Jones about his new graphic novel, which takes place on the high seas, and why he is going to endow the nation with his ponytail. In May 2017, David Fickling Books publishes a new graphic novel in one volume Philip Pullman titled “The Adventures of John Blake: the Mystery of the Ghost Ship” with illustrations by Fred Fordham. However, those who are already impatient can read the novel in the weekly issues of The Phoenix comic starting May 13th. As a kid, Pulman was a big fan of comics. He liked the British The Eagle and Luck of the Legion, as well as the American comic books featuring Superman and Batman, which he discovered when his family lived in Australia in 1956. It was impossible to find the latter in Great Britain, since parents and teachers were frightened by the alarmist Continue reading

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When were superheroes gloomy and harsh?
The conditional periodization of American comic books about superheroes implies decline. The formation years of the genre, 1938-1945, are called the Golden Age. Then - after a ten-year hiatus, when…

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Incomplete atlas of fantastic maps
In the second issue of The Keepers (comic book series), masked adventurers gather around a map of the United States. It shows in close-up the geographical regions marked as “Anti-war…

...

"Rap Robot Max", the first hip-hop comic book
Today, the hip-hop industry and everything connected with it - music, clothes, concert tickets - is a place where many billions of dollars rotate, but from the beginning of the…

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"Nobody will fall in love with Peter" and other subtleties of a forgotten rock opera about Spider-Man
Of course, it may seem that the most curious musical adventure involving Peter Parker is the 2011 Broadway musical Spider-Man: Extinguish Darkness, which seemed to curse long before the premiere,…

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