Body of work: how a graphic novel became an outlet for the release of female shame
This art form has allowed many female illustrators to point out inconsistencies in how they see their bodies and the bodies of men around them. Author: Abrams Books A Picture…

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Harms, Zabolotsky, Sailor Moon: what new Russian comics are made of
Parallel Comics for a year of existence managed to conclude a contract with Marvel, publish several books about Spider-Man, Avengers and X-Men. This fall, the publishing house expanded its interests…

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“I don’t want the comic book to be beautiful”: interview with the creator of oil superhero Tyumen
Tyumen Gosha Elaev became famous by inventing the oil superhero Tyumen. The crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for the publication of the third volume of Tyumen is now ending. Yegor…

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How Americans imported German humor

“Bam!” On Sunday: Comics pioneers are honored in Frankfurt as pioneers of contemporary art history. Against their background, Picasso looks outdated. Among them was a German artist. In 1900, a powerful explosion occurred in America, and it is difficult to imagine it in any other symbols except in those visual images of sounds that are still used in almost every cliche-filled article on comic art: “Bang!”, “Bam! ”Or even“ Babakh! ”Inside jagged figures illustrating various detonations in comics. Drawn, obviously, impressed by the German silent film “Doctor Caligari’s Cabinet”: Sunday page from Cliff Sterrett’s series “Polly and Her Pals” of March 20, 1927 Photo: Cliff Sterret Avant-garde was not only in Paris and Berlin Because the explosion did not take place where there were artistic flashes of the penultimate turn of the century: in Paris, Berlin and Rome with their cube, expression, futurism and surrealism. On the contrary, this happened in popular culture on the other side of the Atlantic. Its sellers were not art dealers, but newspaper magnates who were looking for material for their increasingly fast and cheap printing presses, and their customers were descendants of immigrants who spoke only broken English until Pablo Picasso, a fan of the Krazy Kat comics George Herriman. Herriman and his contemporaries are now represented at the Frankfurt Sheerne showroom with the striking definition of “Another Avant-Garde”. It is fully justified. Moreover: a careful observer is seized by the feeling that in this case he is dealing with a real avant-garde. While the explosive novelty of many of the works of the official canon of Art Nouveau is hardly understood today by everyone, the drawings by Winsor Mackay, Lionel Feininger, George Herriman, Cliff Sterrett, Charles Forbell and Frank King are still fresh and striking. Of course, this is unfair: because for many of the works of Picasso or the Surrealists over the past 100 years they have simply become accustomed and have seen enough of them to the point of fatigue. Elephant alarm clock: Sunday page from the Little Nemo in Slumberland series from The New York Herald on September 23, 1906 Photo: Winsor Mackay But it’s also obvious that the comic book authors who did not pass the academic drill and were not limited by any artistic and princely ambitions more open to brain stimuli at the beginning of the 20th century than artists captivated by art and anti-art. The audience involuntarily recalls a visit to Schoenberg’s opera Moses and Aaron in Berlin several years ago. While the classical opera audience trembled endlessly, the opera amateur who, among other things, went through the schools of free jazz and string, sat without straining, and did not hear anything frightening: “It sounded like that, 20th century”, – was his conclusion. And now we go to the Frankfurt exhibition and think: “So he looked, the 20th century.” They excelled the Golden Age artists. Given the abundance of forms, imagination and talent that are presented here, it seems outrageously unfair that Roy Lichtenstein entered the history of art, because decades after these pioneers, he incorporated the template elements of their epigones into his paintings. After all, those people not only painted better than Liechtenstein, they also exceeded the comic artists of the mid-20th century, from whom Liechtenstein borrowed. Compared to Mackay, Feininger, Herriman, King, Forbell and Sterrett, most artists called the “golden age” of comics from the early superhero era when Superman, Batman or Captain America appeared, look like hacks with hand paralysis. Only with avant-garde and underground comic books of the 1970s, with magazines such as Métal hurlant and Raw, with people such as Robert Kramb, Art Spiegelman or Mobius, this genre again reached the fullness of the pictorial forms that it already possessed the beginning. The Great Unknown: Charles Forbell’s “Naughty Pete” on the Sunday New York Herald page of October 19, 1913 Photo: Charles Forbell The reason for this step backward between these two periods could be to change the target audience: newspaper, for which the early explorers created their daily strips and painstaking and ambitious Sunday pages, consisted of adults, sometimes even intellectuals. While the mid-20th century comic books were bought by twelve-year-olds. Feininger and Mackay were already known. There was no need to explain why now the “pioneers of comics” are first shown at one of the most significant German art museums. It must be explained why this happened so late. After all, this is not about completely unknown artists. First of all, Winsor Mackay was published and adopted in our country in the 80s, when the comic, not least due to the spiritual assistance received from France from developing countries, was opened as the “ninth art form.”

The art of illustrating the "Art of War"
When more than thirty years ago Tsai (Tsai Chih Chung) decided to adapt Sun Tzu's “Art of War” into a more modern format, he wanted to breathe new life into…

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Tobias Carroll on the Generating Power of Literary Adaptation
Since the advent of language, there is a form of its transmission. Comic book creators have long used literary sources for inspiration or direct retelling. We have come a long…

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How Americans imported German humor
“Bam!” On Sunday: Comics pioneers are honored in Frankfurt as pioneers of contemporary art history. Against their background, Picasso looks outdated. Among them was a German artist. In 1900, a…

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Comic book industry: the eternal confrontation between DC and Marvel
They made every effort to create their own and completely fantastic world. Both publishers have repeatedly changed their names and approaches to the audience in order to keep their attention.…

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