Kelly Sue DeKonnick, the author of revolutionary comics, talks about the changes that have come to the world of graphic novels.
Around the person of Kelly Sue DeKonnick, feminists and inspirers of one of the most swirling and fascinating stories in today's comics, a truly unbridled cult has developed. Men and…

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The World "Zhui": Alexander Ilyin about a detective comic book lined up around food
In Russian, the second volume of the comic strip series “Rui” was released - a gloomy fantasy about a detective who can see his past by a bitten apple. However,…

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Special nomination "The Best Graphic Novels"
As part of the 2016 Readers' Choice Award, we present you our Special Opportunity project. This is a series of book reviews that have received particular attention this year. In…

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“Love and rockets” again on horseback: “We have influenced a bunch of artists”

The cult comic strip about California punks next month will return to newsstands and talk about heroes looking back on their own lives. One of the leading comic book industry magazines, Previews, called it “2016 Comic Book Event.” The new issue of Love and Rockets (Love and Rockets, Vol. IV No. 1), dated July 2016, but actually only available for sale on September 28, does not include any plastic figures of super-soldiers. Instead, the comic book, which is experiencing its rebirth on the 35th anniversary of its appearance, will simply continue its story – the one that has repeatedly earned the approval of critics and talked about aging punks from Southern California and rural cranks from Central America. Rolling Stone Magazine recognized Love and Rockets as the best graphic novel of all time, not related to superheroes, comparing them with the music of Clash, REM, and Run-DMC. Time magazine, meanwhile, included its creators, Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez, brothers of Hispanic descent, in the Top 100 innovators of the 21st century. Jaime and Gilbert (the third founder of the series, Mario Hernandez stopped participating in the project several years ago) began writing and drawing their comics in 1981, although his form of release, like the brothers’ stories themselves, changed somewhat over time. In the late 90s, the release of Love and Rockets was temporarily interrupted, and then its creators changed the format and for the last few years published one 100-page issue per year. Now the comic returns as a regular magazine in the format 8½ by 10¾ inches (21.6 by 27.3 cm – approx. Transl.) – the same size that the Hernandez brothers used at the very beginning when they launched their project, spending $ 700 on it received from a younger brother. “All of his versions were great, but we like the magazine format the most,” says Gilbert. “On 32 pages, interest in the story is easier to maintain because it does not take much time to bring the comic to mind.” “A whole year of living with one comic strip makes my brain fog,” Jaime agrees. “I realized that it’s better for me to finish the work more often.” Gilbert and Jaime grew up in the city of Oxnard, California. Their father did not speak English well, painted watercolors and died when Jaime was only eight years old. Their mother, meanwhile, was an avid comic book fan. “She read comics from childhood and drew her own versions of characters,” says Gilbert. “She especially liked the [heroes of the 1940s] The Avenger and Captain Marvel.” “These comics seemed completely normal to us. I had five brothers and sisters, and we all read the same comics and admired them, ”says Jaime. “But as soon as we went beyond our own home, it turned out that this was not so normal at all.” In fact, for the comic book fans, the tastes of the Hernandez brothers were too exquisite. “When I was young, the main comic strip was universally believed to be Spider-Man,” Jaime recalls. “However, we did not think so.” I do not think that Spider-Man was as good then as it was during the time of its creator Steve Ditko, just as I do not think that Fantastic Four was as good as when it was made by Jack Kirby. Therefore, we drew our own versions. ” Cover for the upcoming release of Love and Rockets: South California Punk Stories Source: Supplied Gilbert and Jaime relied on their mother’s enthusiasm, as well as classic Hollywood films and local music, which has a prominent place in Jaime’s history. “We had our own punk party, which appeared much later than in Los Angeles, London and New York,” he recalls. “And people like that told us:“ Oh, you guys started punk at your place? Haha, you got a little late. ” But we didn’t care. ” Jaime says he introduced punks to his comic strip mainly because of their clothes. “The way these people dress up looks much more interesting than any superhero costumes,” he said. At the same time, his personal relationship became an occasion for discussion. Jaime eventually married a woman who served as the prototype for one of his favorite heroines, Laetitia Esperanza “Hope” Glass. “I really liked her hot temper, foul language and how much she doesn’t care what other people think about it,” he says. “That’s why I came up with my punk girls.” Gilbert, meanwhile, came up with Palomar, a fictional village in Central America, where rural life is sprinkled with a fair amount of magical realism. The artist says that, despite his Mesoamerican legacy (Mesoamerica is the southern part of Mexico and all of Central America – approx. Transl.), He took very little from his own experience. “I specifically went to Mexico for this, but that’s all,” he admits. “I invented almost everything myself.”

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