"Rent: A Baster Casey Biography"
The film company Franco bought the rights to the film adaptation of the book "Rent: a biography of Buster Casey." Recently, James Franco writes, directs, produces and plays in so…

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Drama queens: why the theme of women and power is so popular on screens
From The Game of Thrones by George Martin to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Fiction, which unfolds in “alternative reality,” has recently become incredibly popular, which is not surprising…

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HOW TO MAKE A PLOT FOR A COMIC AND WRITING A SCENARIO
Why do I need a script In time immemorial, a man picked up a notebook, drew the first page on 12 cells and began to draw a comic book. The…

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Art and suffering in Angouleme: Is there a place for a woman in the comic book industry?

The 43rd International Comic Festival, the most significant event of its kind in Europe, held in Angouleme, a city in France, ended a few days ago on a sullen note: during the award ceremony, the speaker, host of literary radio, took the floor and announced the first false winners, and only then real ones. The grand prize for a special book, the Fauve d’Or, ultimately went to Richard McGuire’s “Here,” described as “brilliant and revolutionary” by Luke Sant in the New York Times. But the damage has already been done. Not only the publishers and authors felt humiliated, but it was also unclear how the ceremonial master could have thought that such a cruel trick could be fun. The opening of the Festival took place in the same unpleasant vein, with a wave of tactless comments by their director Frank Bond, after the organizers were accused of sexism. The list of 30 nominees did not include a single woman. Then Calvin Reid, senior editor of weekly news in the publishing world and co-editor of PW Comics World, organized a roundtable in Angouleme to discuss the presence of women in the comic book world. You can find a detailed written report by Reid directly from the Festival about this secluded dispute over the Grand Prix in Angouleme. In this article, Reid emphasizes the full significance of this event, making all misunderstandings more regrettable. He writes: “Unlike American comic conventions, Angouleme is a monument to publishing. Here you will not see any blockbusters, video games, transmedia projects on the screen, and in fact, magazines with American-style comics. In Angouleme, only books — in hardcover or paperback — from more than 300 different publishers. ” “Moreover,” continues Reid, “Angouleme is also the main market for rights to graphic novels. About 60 publishers (including several American) are registered, issuing permits and selling rights. Panelists on women in comics. Sarah Howell, left, and Cliodna Lyons speak in a discussion organized by Calvin Reid. Posted by Olivia Snage The two women participating in this talk are Irish illustrator Kliodna Lyons and Australian cartoonist and director of the Melbourne Indie Comic Festival, Sarah Howell. Raid, who said he sees “an incredible Renaissance in women creators” and a comprehensive increase in diversity, asked Lyons and Howell to talk about how modern industry leaves room for women. Howell said that overall, sexism is not “explicit, but secondary”. Women artists in public always take on the role of only accompanying male artists. “Women are not as good as self-promotion, and often do not attend social events, which, by and large, are focused on men,” she says. To counter this, Howell decided to organize a monthly event in Melbourne called “Additional Female Drawing,” where female cartoonists and illustrators talk about their work. Lyons agreed with Howell and said: “You are always doomed to be a girlfriend rather than a creator. When they meet a married couple of artists, people primarily turn to a man. ” “In Ireland especially,” says Lyons, “there is a clique of men who work for Marvel. I do not want to say that I belittle men, because they are really talented, but they get this job with privileges, because they can go and have a drink with the guys, thereby making contact. If you do all this and you are a woman, then you will be called slutty, while a man is just relaxing with his friends. ” Calvin Reid (left) organizes a roundtable discussion on women in the comic book industry. Author: Olivia Snage Lions finds the UK comics scene very interesting and “for 8 years ahead of Ireland, small British publishers produce incredible comics with a true personality, and the authors are both men and women alike. Angus Kardzhil, who publishes graphic novels in Faber & Faber, said that distinction, dissimilarity is always an exciting issue in the UK, but not gender distinction. He feels, however, that in London the works of women are extremely improved and refers to women, authors of the most outstanding graphic novels, Emily Carroll, Evie Wilde and Isabelle Greenberg. “Network comics,” Cargill added, “have become very useful for women creating their stage.” “The Internet can be a toxic place,” say speakers who have put forward examples of online insults at women artists and their fans. Of course, many of these insults are personal in nature, focusing on physical symptoms: men are criticized for WHAT they do, and women for being women. Reid, who is recording another comic book podcast featuring two women, said his colleagues will pull out from the network what “female comic book fans are completely repulsive.”

Kami Garcia, author of Joker / Harley: Criminal Mind, tells how she destroyed the famous image of Harley Quinn in her new crime thriller
Kami Garcia, author of Joker / Harley: Criminal Sanity (Joker / Harley: Criminal Intelligence), tells how she destroyed the famous image of Harley Quinn in her new crime thriller. Soon…

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Illustrator Tom Gold comments on his comics
Bumkniga publishes Cooking with Kafka, a new short comic book by Tom Gold. At the request of the Billboard Daily, illustrator The Guardian and The New Yorker commented on several…

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Drama queens: why the theme of women and power is so popular on screens
From The Game of Thrones by George Martin to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Fiction, which unfolds in “alternative reality,” has recently become incredibly popular, which is not surprising…

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What Batman did for me
The task that we traditionally assign to classical culture is successfully completed by comics. Once I wrote about the fact that Russian classics do not instill morality (if morality means…

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