LORAN GALMO: WAYS OF PUBLISHING COMICS
Everyone was looking forward to this meeting in the Sakharov Center. In France, today is one of the most coherent systems for publishing comics. Rarely is there an opportunity to…

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Body of work: how a graphic novel became an outlet for the release of female shame
This art form has allowed many female illustrators to point out inconsistencies in how they see their bodies and the bodies of men around them. Author: Abrams Books A Picture…

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"Rent: A Baster Casey Biography"
The film company Franco bought the rights to the film adaptation of the book "Rent: a biography of Buster Casey." Recently, James Franco writes, directs, produces and plays in so…

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plot developed

Comic book author Birgit Vaye: It’s Paradise Cold

Birgit Vaye combines avant-garde comics with the African language of forms. In Madgermanes [“Majermans”], she captured the story of the Mozambican workers in the GDR. They were promised education, but they received only casual work. After 17 hours, they were supposed to stay in their dormitories, women and men were housed separately, and communication with the locals was not welcome. Pregnant women had to have an abortion, or they were sent back, and half of their earnings were sent to Mozambique to guarantee their subsequent return to their homeland. So in the 1980s there were about 20,000 contract workers from Mozambique – they were called the “Majermans”: apparently, intentionally distorting the phrase “Made in Germany” in the socialist fraternal country of the GDR. A Special Chapter There is one special chapter in the history of the German Democratic Republic going down, which Birgit Vaye reveals in Madgermanes. As in many stories about the GDR, the tragic and the absurd are next to each other. “They took off in response to a promise that they would go to heaven and learn something,” says Birgit Vaye, a German artist and comic book author born in 1969 who grew up in Continue reading

Kelly Sue DeKonnick, the author of revolutionary comics, talks about the changes that have come to the world of graphic novels.

Around the person of Kelly Sue DeKonnick, feminists and inspirers of one of the most swirling and fascinating stories in today’s comics, a truly unbridled cult has developed. Men and women, inspired by the unyielding characters of the comic book Bitch Planet, a futuristic space refrain to motivate 60-70s films about exploiting women in prisons, often send the author photos of their tattoos in the form of the “incompatible” mark – the same as the heroines of the book disagree with the existing state of affairs. And around Carol Danvers, the main character of the comic book Captain Marvel (Captain Marvel) – who, while DeKonnick was working on her, contributed to the appearance of a huge number of works about superheroes where women are not “humiliated”, – the author speaks of them, – There was a whole fan base, “Carol Corps”. These fans made so much noise and became so noticeable that the comic strip Continue reading

Illustrator Tom Gold comments on his comics
Bumkniga publishes Cooking with Kafka, a new short comic book by Tom Gold. At the request of the Billboard Daily, illustrator The Guardian and The New Yorker commented on several…

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Drama queens: why the theme of women and power is so popular on screens
From The Game of Thrones by George Martin to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Fiction, which unfolds in “alternative reality,” has recently become incredibly popular, which is not surprising…

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Tobias Carroll on the Generating Power of Literary Adaptation
Since the advent of language, there is a form of its transmission. Comic book creators have long used literary sources for inspiration or direct retelling. We have come a long…

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"Rent: A Baster Casey Biography"
The film company Franco bought the rights to the film adaptation of the book "Rent: a biography of Buster Casey." Recently, James Franco writes, directs, produces and plays in so…

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